Presbyopia

During the normal course of aging, the eyes slowly lose their ability to focus on objects up close. This is due to a loss of the flexibility of the crystalline lens inside the eye. The effects of presbyopia typically start around the age of 40, and once it begins, it will progressively worsen. There is no way to prevent this change, but to compensate for this condition, prescription eyeglasses or contact lenses can be prescribed. There are multiple treatment options available including reading only glasses, progressive addition lenses, bifocals, trifocals, and even contact lenses. Because presbyopia usually occurs in combination with farsightedness, nearsightedness, or astigmatism, your eye care professional can determine which treatment option will bring you the clearest visual outcome. Since this condition will continue to affect the ability of the eyes to focus properly, periodic changes in your prescription will likely be necessary to maintain your best vision.

Signs of Presbyopia:

  • Difficulty focusing on reading material or computer work
  • Progressively holding objects further out to see clearly
  • Complaining your arms are “too short” to read at a comfortable distance
  • Trouble reading fine or small print
  • Eyestrain or headaches after prolonged near work
  • Struggling to read or see in dim lighting situations
  • Blurry vision when changing focus from an object far away to one up-close