Services

Optometry Services

At Eye Care of Iowa, we are pleased to offer a wide range of optometry services for our community! Our experienced optometrists can provide you with thorough eye evaluations, determine if you need corrective lenses and your exact prescription strength, fit you with the appropriate specialty eyewear, and help you pick out the most flattering pair of glasses for your face shape and skin tone.

Our new patient appointments always begin with a comprehensive eye exam. If you are unsure of your family’s eye health history, it’s helpful to research beforehand, so we can better evaluate your own eye health. Visit our online patient center to download supplemental forms you can fill out before your appointment. If you have never had a comprehensive exam, don’t worry! All the tests and exercises are simple and painless.

Our experienced optometrists can diagnose and treat eye diseases and identify general eye health problems including diabetes, anemia, high blood pressure, and others. We can also test for and fit specialty eyewear for sports, occupations, other activities and hobbies, and safety glasses.

Our Optometric Services:

  • Comprehensive eye exams
  • Contact lens fittings
  • Diagnosis and treatment of eye disease
  • Specialized testing and care for cataracts, glaucoma, and others
  • Pre-and post-operative care for eye disease
  • Eye emergencies
  • Foreign object removal
  • Vision services for visually impaired

We can answer your questions about optometry services, our eye care practice, eye health products, and more.

Schedule your eye exam today by requesting an appointment online, or by calling our office.

Comprehensive Exams

Children with undiagnosed visual conditions and/or eye health problems face many challenges academically, socially, and athletically. There are a number of potential eye related problems that can occur during infancy resulting in developmental delays. It is essential these problems are detected in order to ensure proper development of the visual system during this early developmental period. Eye Care of Iowa believes in the importance of a thorough eye examination in all infants, and are proud to participate in the INFANT-SEE program. For more information about this program, please view their website:infantsee
stock23-1The visual system of newborns is not fully developed. Just as a baby has to learn to walk and talk, they also have to learn to see and process the information about what they are actually seeing. As recommended by the American Optometric Association, your child should have their first eye examination at about 6 months of age.Even though your child may not be very responsive to the doctor, there are objective ways to test for excessive amounts of nearsightedness, farsightedness, or astigmatism. While it is normal for a child at this age to be farsighted to some degree, the key is to detect if there is any significant prescription that if left undetected, could hinder the baby’s development. Additionally, the doctor would check the ability of the eyes to move in a coordinated manner in different directions to make sure all six of the eye muscles are working properly. It is also essential to have an assessment to evaluate that the eyes indeed are aligned correctly. Ideally, both eyes should be pointing in a straight-ahead position. However, if an eye is slightly turned, either in or out, and left uncorrected, a “lazy eye” may develop. Furthermore, the general health of the eyes is evaluated.The following are the recommended guidelines from the American Optometric Association in regards to the frequency of eye examinations in children:

Examination Interval
Patient Age Asymptomatic/risk free At-risk
Birth to 24 months At 6 months of age at 6 months of age or as recommended
2-5 Years old At 3 years of age At 3 years of age or as recommended
6 to 18 years Before first grade and every two years thereafter Annually or as recommended

stock24The visual development process continues as a child develops visually guided eye-hand movements, gross-body coordination skills, fine motor movement skills, and eventually, the visual perceptual abilities needed to be successful in school activities.

 

At this age, it is imperative that the child’s vision be re-assessed in order to determine if any need for a prescription has developed. The ability of the eyes to follow a moving target, change focus between two different targets, as well as the ability to move the eyes smoothly in different directions should be evaluated as these are essential skills needed as one begins pre-school. The alignment of the eyes relative to one another should also be re-checked at this point. Even though the eyes may appear to be looking straight ahead, the visual system may be using an excessive amount of energy to maintain that straight ahead alignment, eventually leading to visual problems. The ability to perceive different colors and the ability to recognize the world in three-dimensions (depth perception), should also be tested. It is also important to have an overall eye health examination to ensure no abnormalities have developed.

Signs that may indicate a vision development problem exists include:

  • Struggling with activities requiring good eye-hand coordination (catching or throwing a ball)
  • Difficulty with body coordination skills during physical activities (riding a bike, skipping, or jumping rope)
  • Confusion when asked to recognize or sort colors, shapes, letters and numbers
  • Avoids detail oriented activities (coloring pictures or working on puzzles)
  • Unable to appreciate the 3-D effect from a 3-D movie
  • Excessive sensitivity to light
  • Relatively short attention span
  • Turning of an eye in or out
  • Rubbing the eyes frequently
  • Tilting or turning head to one side
  • Squinting
  • Sitting close to the television or holding a book close when reading

stock26From reading a story or completing math problems, to playing games during recess, your child is constantly using their eyes throughout their school day. It is estimated that up to 80% of the skills a child learns occurs through his or her eyes. If their vision is not functioning appropriately, succeeding in school and participation in extra-curricular activities will be compromised. With a full comprehensive eye exam, the visual skills required in order to learn to read and write will be fully evaluated.

 

The basic vision skills needed to function well in school include:

  • Distance Vision: The ability to see clearly when looking at anything greater than an arm’s reach away
  • Near Vision: The ability to see clearly when looking at anything within an arm’s reach, including working on a computer or reading a book
  • Eye Tracking Skills: The ability to follow a moving object, move the eyes from one target to another, and maintain focus on a stationary target
  • Eye Teaming Skills: The ability to make eye movements in a smooth, coordinated manner during activities such as following print across a page when reading or following a thrown ball
  • Focusing Skills: The ability to maintain both eyes accurately focused at a certain distance to see clearly and comfortably, while also functioning to change focus quickly between different distances, as needed when looking back and forth between the whiteboard and a notebook on the desk
  • Peripheral Awareness: The ability to be attentive to objects located off to the side even when you are not looking straight at it
  • Depth Perception: The ability to perceive the world in three-dimensions and judge the relative distance between objects in all directions
  • Eye-Hand Coordination: The ability to process visual information to direct movements so that the eyes and hands work together
  • Visual Perception: The ability to interpret what is seen in the visual environment for quick and accurate identification and discrimination of objects, for comparing similarities and differences, recognizing and generalizing forms, and making conclusions based on visual information

If any of these visual related skills are insufficient, your child will have to work harder in all that they do. This can lead to visually related headaches, fatigue, and eyestrain. As a parent or teacher, it is important to take note if the child struggles with any of the following:

  • Loses their place when reading
  • Avoids close work (i.e. reading)
  • Low level of comprehension or efficiency during reading or other near activities
  • Difficulty remembering what was read
  • Holds reading material closer than a normal working distance
  • Fatigued after completing homework
  • Reverses letters when reading or writing
  • Uses their finger to maintain place when reading
  • Skips or confuses small words when reading
  • Reports seeing “double”
  • Eye-ache, brow-ache, or generalized eye discomfort when reading or writing
  • Short attention span
  • Rubs their eyes or blinks excessively
  • Complains of headaches
  • Turns or tilts their head to one side
  • Repeatedly performs below expected potential

Some children who suffer from learning difficulties due to excessive distractibility and hyperactivity are often labeled as ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder). Undetected vision conditions can elicit these same symptoms, and because of this, children may be incorrectly diagnosed as having ADHD, when in fact there is an underlying, treatable visual problem.

Since changes in vision can occur without any obvious signs or symptoms, your child should have a yearly comprehensive eye examination, or more frequently if specific problems or risk factors are present. One common misconception in this age group is that a school vision screening or pediatrician’s screening replaces the need for an eye exam. This is merely a screening to check at what level of vision your child is functioning at, and in no way should be used as a substitute for their comprehensive eye examination.

The doctors at Eye Care of Iowa recommend yearly eye examinations. The necessity for more frequent examinations depend on factors such as if you wear prescription glasses or contact lenses, have been diagnosed or watched closely for the development of diabetes or hypertension, have a family history of eye disease (glaucoma, macular degeneration, etc.), work in an occupation that requires high visual demands or one that may be potentially hazardous to the eyes, take prescription or nonprescription drugs with eye-related side effects, have a history of eye surgery, or have some other health concern or condition not previously mentioned.

 

It is a fact that your vision changes with age. It is important to be attentive to these changes. Although some of these changes may be a normal age-related change, other symptoms can be early signs of eye diseases. Regular comprehensive examinations, along with healthy life-style choices, will significantly improve your chances of maintaining good vision.

The examination itself is a detailed process used to determine what is causing your current problems. The treatment program is then tailored to your specific needs and issues. The doctors will take the time to ensure that you not only receive the best care possible, but also that you have a full understanding of the diagnosis and treatment options available.

In addition to utilizing the latest technology, our doctors have years of experience with treating and managing a variety of eye conditions. Eye Care of Iowa is committed to providing the highest level of care to each and every one of our patients.

What is Vision Therapy?

Certain eye conditions are not correctable with glasses or contact lenses. These deficiencies instead require an individualized treatment program to strengthen the muscles and nerves involved in allowing the visual system to function efficiently.

A developmental visual evaluation is the first step in uncovering a certain visual deficiency. The doctor will assess the alignment of the eyes, the ability of the eyes to work together (termed eye teaming), the focusing capability of the eyes, and the potential to coordinate and plan eye movements.

These visual-motor skills are then enhanced through weekly, one-on-one in-office therapy sessions with a vision therapist through the use of specialized computer and optical devices, including therapeutic lenses, prisms, and/or filters. As the therapy progresses, the patient’s newly acquired visual skills are reinforced and made automatic through repetition and by integration with various motor and other cognitive tasks.

Who needs Vision Therapy?

Vision problems affect one out of every four children and over half of those children who struggle with reading. Certain signs that indicate someone is coping with a visual disorder include:

  • Taking a long time to complete homework
  • Difficulty with paying attention or staying on task
  • Complaints of eyestrain and/or headaches
  • Struggling with activities requiring good eye-hand coordination (catching or throwing a ball)
  • Difficulty with body coordination skills during physical activities (riding a bike, skipping, or jumping rope)
  • Confusion when asked to recognize or sort colors, shapes, letters and numbers
  • Avoids detail oriented activities (coloring pictures or working on puzzles)
  • Unable to appreciate the 3-D effect from a 3-D movie
  • Turning of an eye in or out (see lazy eye)
  • Rubbing the eyes frequently
  • Blinking frequently
  • Tilting or turning head to one side
  • Experiencing double vision when reading
  • Eyes tire easily or child gets sleepy easily
  • Words move, jump, swim, or appear to float on the page
  • Words “blur” or come in and out of focus
  • Slow reader
  • Difficulty with remembering what was read (comprehension)
  • Loses place when reading or rereads the same line of words
  • Holds his or her head close to the paper when reading or writing
  • Confuses letters/words or reverses letters/numbers
  • Uses a finger as a marker when reading
  • Moves head around when reading

WHAT ABOUT SPORTS RELATED VISUAL TRAINING TECHNIQUES?

Accurate vision and athletic visual skills can be evaluated, developed, and then strengthened through vision training exercises. These exercises can successfully improve skills used in every sporting event. Our therapy program works specifically in increasing one’s eye-hand coordination, visual reaction time, peripheral awareness, eye teaming, focusing, tracking, and visualization skill sets. Enhancing one’s visual skill set is essential in taking your game to the next level!

Any of the above symptoms are a sign that your child may have a vision issue and should have an evaluation to determine the depth of the problem. Our goal is to properly diagnose and treat such visual limitations, thus allowing one to develop the visual skills and cognitive ability to read and learn at their fullest potential. If you have any concerns about your child, please call for an appointment today or schedule an appointment on-line.

 

Children with undiagnosed visual conditions and/or eye health problems face many challenges academically, socially, and athletically. There are a number of potential eye related problems that can occur during infancy resulting in developmental delays. It is essential these problems are detected in order to ensure proper development of the visual system during this early developmental period. Eye Care of Iowa believes in the importance of a thorough eye examination in all infants, and are proud to participate in the INFANT-SEE program. For more information about this program, please view their website:infantsee
stock23-1The visual system of newborns is not fully developed. Just as a baby has to learn to walk and talk, they also have to learn to see and process the information about what they are actually seeing. As recommended by the American Optometric Association, your child should have their first eye examination at about 6 months of age.Even though your child may not be very responsive to the doctor, there are objective ways to test for excessive amounts of nearsightedness, farsightedness, or astigmatism. While it is normal for a child at this age to be farsighted to some degree, the key is to detect if there is any significant prescription that if left undetected, could hinder the baby’s development. Additionally, the doctor would check the ability of the eyes to move in a coordinated manner in different directions to make sure all six of the eye muscles are working properly. It is also essential to have an assessment to evaluate that the eyes indeed are aligned correctly. Ideally, both eyes should be pointing in a straight-ahead position. However, if an eye is slightly turned, either in or out, and left uncorrected, a “lazy eye” may develop. Furthermore, the general health of the eyes is evaluated.The following are the recommended guidelines from the American Optometric Association in regards to the frequency of eye examinations in children:

Birth to 24 Months
Examination Interval

Asymptomatic/risk free :
At 6 months of age
At-Risk :
At 6 months of age or as recommended

2 to 5 Years Old
Examination Interval

Asymptomatic/risk free :
3 years of age
At-Risk :
3 years of age or as recommended

6 to 18 Years Old
Examination Interval

Asymptomatic/risk free :
Before first grade and every two years thereafter
At-Risk :
Annually or as recommended.

 

stock24The visual development process continues as a child develops visually guided eye-hand movements, gross-body coordination skills, fine motor movement skills, and eventually, the visual perceptual abilities needed to be successful in school activities.

 

At this age, it is imperative that the child’s vision be re-assessed in order to determine if any need for a prescription has developed. The ability of the eyes to follow a moving target, change focus between two different targets, as well as the ability to move the eyes smoothly in different directions should be evaluated as these are essential skills needed as one begins pre-school. The alignment of the eyes relative to one another should also be re-checked at this point. Even though the eyes may appear to be looking straight ahead, the visual system may be using an excessive amount of energy to maintain that straight ahead alignment, eventually leading to visual problems. The ability to perceive different colors and the ability to recognize the world in three-dimensions (depth perception), should also be tested. It is also important to have an overall eye health examination to ensure no abnormalities have developed.

Signs that may indicate a vision development problem exists include:

  • Struggling with activities requiring good eye-hand coordination (catching or throwing a ball)
  • Difficulty with body coordination skills during physical activities (riding a bike, skipping, or jumping rope)
  • Confusion when asked to recognize or sort colors, shapes, letters and numbers
  • Avoids detail oriented activities (coloring pictures or working on puzzles)
  • Unable to appreciate the 3-D effect from a 3-D movie
  • Excessive sensitivity to light
  • Relatively short attention span
  • Turning of an eye in or out
  • Rubbing the eyes frequently
  • Tilting or turning head to one side
  • Squinting
  • Sitting close to the television or holding a book close when reading

stock26From reading a story or completing math problems, to playing games during recess, your child is constantly using their eyes throughout their school day. It is estimated that up to 80% of the skills a child learns occurs through his or her eyes. If their vision is not functioning appropriately, succeeding in school and participation in extra-curricular activities will be compromised. With a full comprehensive eye exam, the visual skills required in order to learn to read and write will be fully evaluated.

 

The basic vision skills needed to function well in school include:

  • Distance Vision: The ability to see clearly when looking at anything greater than an arm’s reach away
  • Near Vision: The ability to see clearly when looking at anything within an arm’s reach, including working on a computer or reading a book
  • Eye Tracking Skills: The ability to follow a moving object, move the eyes from one target to another, and maintain focus on a stationary target
  • Eye Teaming Skills: The ability to make eye movements in a smooth, coordinated manner during activities such as following print across a page when reading or following a thrown ball
  • Focusing Skills: The ability to maintain both eyes accurately focused at a certain distance to see clearly and comfortably, while also functioning to change focus quickly between different distances, as needed when looking back and forth between the whiteboard and a notebook on the desk
  • Peripheral Awareness: The ability to be attentive to objects located off to the side even when you are not looking straight at it
  • Depth Perception: The ability to perceive the world in three-dimensions and judge the relative distance between objects in all directions
  • Eye-Hand Coordination: The ability to process visual information to direct movements so that the eyes and hands work together
  • Visual Perception: The ability to interpret what is seen in the visual environment for quick and accurate identification and discrimination of objects, for comparing similarities and differences, recognizing and generalizing forms, and making conclusions based on visual information

If any of these visual related skills are insufficient, your child will have to work harder in all that they do. This can lead to visually related headaches, fatigue, and eyestrain. As a parent or teacher, it is important to take note if the child struggles with any of the following:

  • Loses their place when reading
  • Avoids close work (i.e. reading)
  • Low level of comprehension or efficiency during reading or other near activities
  • Difficulty remembering what was read
  • Holds reading material closer than a normal working distance
  • Fatigued after completing homework
  • Reverses letters when reading or writing
  • Uses their finger to maintain place when reading
  • Skips or confuses small words when reading
  • Reports seeing “double”
  • Eye-ache, brow-ache, or generalized eye discomfort when reading or writing
  • Short attention span
  • Rubs their eyes or blinks excessively
  • Complains of headaches
  • Turns or tilts their head to one side
  • Repeatedly performs below expected potential

Some children who suffer from learning difficulties due to excessive distractibility and hyperactivity are often labeled as ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder). Undetected vision conditions can elicit these same symptoms, and because of this, children may be incorrectly diagnosed as having ADHD, when in fact there is an underlying, treatable visual problem.

Since changes in vision can occur without any obvious signs or symptoms, your child should have a yearly comprehensive eye examination, or more frequently if specific problems or risk factors are present. One common misconception in this age group is that a school vision screening or pediatrician’s screening replaces the need for an eye exam. This is merely a screening to check at what level of vision your child is functioning at, and in no way should be used as a substitute for their comprehensive eye examination.

The doctors at Eye Care of Iowa recommend yearly eye examinations. The necessity for more frequent examinations depend on factors such as if you wear prescription glasses or contact lenses, have been diagnosed or watched closely for the development of diabetes or hypertension, have a family history of eye disease (glaucoma, macular degeneration, etc.), work in an occupation that requires high visual demands or one that may be potentially hazardous to the eyes, take prescription or nonprescription drugs with eye-related side effects, have a history of eye surgery, or have some other health concern or condition not previously mentioned.

 

It is a fact that your vision changes with age. It is important to be attentive to these changes. Although some of these changes may be a normal age-related change, other symptoms can be early signs of eye diseases. Regular comprehensive examinations, along with healthy life-style choices, will significantly improve your chances of maintaining good vision.

The examination itself is a detailed process used to determine what is causing your current problems. The treatment program is then tailored to your specific needs and issues. The doctors will take the time to ensure that you not only receive the best care possible, but also that you have a full understanding of the diagnosis and treatment options available.

In addition to utilizing the latest technology, our doctors have years of experience with treating and managing a variety of eye conditions. Eye Care of Iowa is committed to providing the highest level of care to each and every one of our patients.

What is Vision Therapy?

Certain eye conditions are not correctable with glasses or contact lenses. These deficiencies instead require an individualized treatment program to strengthen the muscles and nerves involved in allowing the visual system to function efficiently.

A developmental visual evaluation is the first step in uncovering a certain visual deficiency. The doctor will assess the alignment of the eyes, the ability of the eyes to work together (termed eye teaming), the focusing capability of the eyes, and the potential to coordinate and plan eye movements.

These visual-motor skills are then enhanced through weekly, one-on-one in-office therapy sessions with a vision therapist through the use of specialized computer and optical devices, including therapeutic lenses, prisms, and/or filters. As the therapy progresses, the patient’s newly acquired visual skills are reinforced and made automatic through repetition and by integration with various motor and other cognitive tasks.

Who needs Vision Therapy?

Vision problems affect one out of every four children and over half of those children who struggle with reading. Certain signs that indicate someone is coping with a visual disorder include:

  • Taking a long time to complete homework
  • Difficulty with paying attention or staying on task
  • Complaints of eyestrain and/or headaches
  • Struggling with activities requiring good eye-hand coordination (catching or throwing a ball)
  • Difficulty with body coordination skills during physical activities (riding a bike, skipping, or jumping rope)
  • Confusion when asked to recognize or sort colors, shapes, letters and numbers
  • Avoids detail oriented activities (coloring pictures or working on puzzles)
  • Unable to appreciate the 3-D effect from a 3-D movie
  • Turning of an eye in or out (see lazy eye)
  • Rubbing the eyes frequently
  • Blinking frequently
  • Tilting or turning head to one side
  • Experiencing double vision when reading
  • Eyes tire easily or child gets sleepy easily
  • Words move, jump, swim, or appear to float on the page
  • Words “blur” or come in and out of focus
  • Slow reader
  • Difficulty with remembering what was read (comprehension)
  • Loses place when reading or rereads the same line of words
  • Holds his or her head close to the paper when reading or writing
  • Confuses letters/words or reverses letters/numbers
  • Uses a finger as a marker when reading
  • Moves head around when reading

WHAT ABOUT SPORTS RELATED VISUAL TRAINING TECHNIQUES?

Accurate vision and athletic visual skills can be evaluated, developed, and then strengthened through vision training exercises. These exercises can successfully improve skills used in every sporting event. Our therapy program works specifically in increasing one’s eye-hand coordination, visual reaction time, peripheral awareness, eye teaming, focusing, tracking, and visualization skill sets. Enhancing one’s visual skill set is essential in taking your game to the next level!

Any of the above symptoms are a sign that your child may have a vision issue and should have an evaluation to determine the depth of the problem. Our goal is to properly diagnose and treat such visual limitations, thus allowing one to develop the visual skills and cognitive ability to read and learn at their fullest potential. If you have any concerns about your child, please call for an appointment today or schedule an appointment on-line.